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Archives for April 2011

  1. 7 Easy Ways To Increase Your Productivity As a Writer and Reader

    7 Easy Ways To Increase Your Productivity As a Writer and Reader

    by Justin C. Key11 comments

    There's a lot of downtime, procrastination, and tomfoolery in the day. Here are a few quick and easy tips on how to make the most of it.

    1. Write on your mobile device. I have My Writing Spot on my iPhone. It's a handy little app that lets you write with minimal formatting and also syncs with your online account. Most of my Scribophile...

  2. Sensual Writing and Why I Love the Smell of Smoke

    Sensual Writing and Why I Love the Smell of Smoke

    by Nina Munteanu10 comments

    When writing sensually, to not connect a described sense to a memory or emotion is to miss a very important opportunity as a storyteller.

    A while ago, as I was driving along a winding country road on my way to Bridgewater from Lunenburg, I ran across the smoke of a small fire. They were obviously doing some roadside clearing. Without t...

  3. Making ‘Sense’ of Writing

    Making ‘Sense’ of Writing

    by Dan Tricarico9 comments

    Using our five senses can create a stronger sense of realism for our readers.

    Everything we know about this world, we learn through our five senses of sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. Consequently, if fiction writers want to recreate the experience of the real world for...

  4. Changing Direction in Mid-Story

    Changing Direction in Mid-Story

    by Laura Preble9 comments

    Taking a story in the wrong direction can be painful, but the result of fixing it can lead to wonderful destinations.

    Have you ever driven to somewhere unfamiliar to you, taken a wrong direction, and had to turn back? I have. Actually, I do it pretty frequently, in life and in writing. One of the most painful writi...

  5. Do Your Research

    Do Your Research

    by Nina Munteanu14 comments

    Doing research for your story can be daunting and even intimidating. It's important for reasons you may not think of.

    Research is something many writers dislike and find daunting or even intimidating. Research for your book or short story will take on many forms from subtle to obvious and from non-directed (opportuni...

  6. David Sedaris, 99 Words, and Why I Write

    David Sedaris, 99 Words, and Why I Write

    by Dan Tricarico8 comments

    Fine writing can inspire, but it can also paralyze.

    DAVID SEDARIS Not long ago, after an especially busy period in my life, I finally forced myself to sit down and read an entire book--Me Talk Pretty One Day, a collection of essays by humorist David S...

  7. Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down

    Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down

    by Laura Preble8 comments

    Finding that special someone can be fraught with pain, betrayal, and confusing contract language.

    A few years back, I met someone. I felt a special spark, the kind that told me this was meant to be. After a good deal of pursuit on my part, I was successful in snagging this person of my dreams, and...

  8. The Stages of Professional Writing

    The Stages of Professional Writing

    by Justin C. Key8 comments

    Learn to love them all...or, at least, tolerate them.

    At my job we do this thing called The 5 Dynamics for every new employee. You answer a series of questions and you get a chart telling you where you are most and least comfortable in the different stag...

  9. Using the Subtext of Body Language in Storytelling

    Using the Subtext of Body Language in Storytelling

    by Nina Munteanu12 comments

    When body language contradicts verbal expression, tension and interesting scenarios increase. This is a great opportunity for writers.

    Kinesics is the study of “body language”, which explores how movements and gestures project a person’s hidden thoughts. Blushing is an obvious reaction. But more subtle ones can be used. When body lan...

  10. The Poor Man’s Writer’s Retreat

    The Poor Man’s Writer’s Retreat

    by Dan Tricarico32 comments

    Treat yourself to a Writer's Retreat without leaving the neighborhood.

    MacDowell. Yaddo. LaMuse. These are not the names of hobbits in a J.R.R. Tolkien novel or Ewoks in George Lucas' latest Space Opera. In fact, they are some of the most prestigious writer's retreats...